zializia:

so you just gonna bring me a birthday gift on my birthday to my birthday party on my birthday with a birthday gift

dzesikaa:

by far the funniest scene in the whole show
middle out

reverseracists:

can someone put Joan rivers in a nursing home already

reverseracists:

can someone put Joan rivers in a nursing home already

outrights:

cuddle me or give me cash either is acceptable 

bootyscientist:

i promise to reblog this every time it shows up on my dash

bootyscientist:

i promise to reblog this every time it shows up on my dash

thestuffofstraws:

Good for you Squirtle.

thestuffofstraws:

Good for you Squirtle.

bedsider:

“I asked strangers to undress each other and get in bed. Nothing else. No rules.” ― Tatia Pilieva 

redefiningbodyimage:

YES

lookdifferentmtv:

We all hear microaggressions — those brief, commonplace statements that make you feel “less than,” excluded, annoyed or put down, whether intentionally or unintentionally.  This is our guide to breaking them down, helping you to avoid making them, and showing you what you can do if you experience them.

What was said

“Your English is so good.”

How it might come across

You may think that telling someone that their English is good is a compliment, but like “where are you really from?”, “your English is so good” can feel like hearing “you’re not American” to the person on the receiving end. This commonly used—and albeit usually well-intended—comment communicates the assumption that the person being “complimented” didn’t grow up speaking English or did not learn it as a first language. This can make them feel like an outsider to their own culture. According to a 2013 US Census survey, most people who speak a non-English language at home also report that they speak English “very well.” In fact, over 60 million Americans speak another language other than English at home, with Spanish, Chinese, and French being among the most commonly spoken alongside English in US households. Pretty impressive, huh?

What you can say instead

If you want to compliment someone on their speaking ability or presentation skills, try commenting on the content of their presentation or their confidence, not their ability to speak English.

What you can do if you hear it

Next time you hear someone say “your English is so good” you can subtly remind them that you may have been speaking English for as long as they have. Want to learn more on why racial microaggressions matter? Head here

gaydtr:

this show is a work of art

© str-wrs